Tag Archives: Navarro

Astonish “The Who Tape” [Mixtape]

Im particularly excited about this project considering I’ve been following Astonish since his AstonishinglyODD Project and now we get the follow up to that project. Astonish delivers his latest masterpiece and what I believe will be a project that turns heads with his “The Who Tape” project that boasts production by Pivot Gang’s Saba, Born Ready Productions, Slot-A, Ikon, among features from Navarro, John Walt, Lungz, and others. For those not familiar with Astonish, this new project is a reminder of why he’s one of the who’s who to listen to in Chicago Hip-Hop.

IKON “Private Stock” [Mixtape]

http://www.audiomack.com/embed4-album/thatsikonmusic/private-stock

After much anticipation we finally get the debut project of Ikon. The “Private Stock” project is a 12 track project comprised of an eclectic mix of instrumentals and featuring phenomenal features from spoken word artists Malcolm London, Pivot Gang, Saba, MFN Melo, Navarro, Nick Astro, ASA’s Reelo & Spazz, Astonish, Jarred AG, Noname Gypsy, Trell Love, Murph Watkins, among many others. To fully comprehend what went into the creation of the project watch the visual below.

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Navarro “Maybe” f/ THEMpeople

One of Chicago’s most prolific emcees is Navarro (formerly known as Scheme) that today drops some new material with the THEMpeople produced spoken word piece “Maybe”. The piece tackles many inner city issues that Navarro has faced from growing up Mexican in the tough streets of Chicago, gang violence, and prejudice that inner city kids face against authorities, as well as addressing the lives slain by those sworn to protect and serve the communities that these officials ended up effecting. More on the release below.

Navarro, formerly known as Scheme*, releases new music produced by THEMpeople. Maybe, is a spoken word piece; an audio interpretation from a piece Navarro wrote and released a few weeks ago, which was shared by major Latino websites, as well as NBC Latino news analyst and more. He considered restructuring it into a “rap song format,” but this was not that. This had to stay the way he wrote it; every word.